Ridge Hill Work

AO: The Ridge

When: 05/31/2021

PAX:

Number of Pax: 4

Pax Names: Blow Out, Jimmy Neutron, Skinner,

Number of FNGS: 0

FNG Names:

QIC: TPS


The BackBlast:

WoR

SSH
10 Burpees OYO
Good mornings

Cusak to bottom of hill

Thang 1

20 irkins
Bernie Sanders
20 Merkins
Run
20 Merkins
Bernie Sanders
20 Merkins
Run
20 Irkins

10 Blockees
Bernie Sanders
10 Burpees
Run
10 Burpees
Bernie Sanders
10 Burpees
Run
10 Blockees

5 Coupon Squats
Bernie Sanders Cusak
5 Coupon Squats
Cusak Run
5 Coupon Squats
Bernie Sanders Cusak
5 Coupon Squats
Cusak Run
5 Coupon Squats

Run to football post and back

 

Thang 2
Cusak to Shelter
50 Dips
50 Merkins
50 Chest press

50 Curls
Repeat

Run to bottom of hill, then to bus stop, then to shelter and back to flags

CoT
Memorial weekend.

 

The 442nd Infantry Regiment was an infantry regiment of the United States Army. The regiment is best known for its history as a fighting unit composed almost entirely of second-generation American soldiers of Japanese ancestry (Nisei) who fought in World War II. Beginning in 1944, the regiment fought primarily in the European Theatre, in particular Italy, southern France, and Germany. The 4,000 men who initially made up the unit in April 1943 had to be replaced nearly 2.5 times. Many of the soldiers from the continental U.S. had families in internment camps while they fought abroad. The unit’s motto was “Go for Broke”.

The unit including the 100th Infantry Battalion earned more than 18,000 awards in less than two years, including more than 4,000 Purple Hearts and 4,000 Bronze Star Medals. The unit was awarded eight Presidential Unit Citations (five earned in one month). Twenty-one of its members were awarded Medals of Honor. The 442nd Regiment was the most decorated unit for its size and length of service in the history of American warfare.

Think on the fact that these men fought for a country who imprisoned their own families simply because of their race. I’m sure each man had his own reasons for serving, but the immense strength necessary to sacrifice for an imperfect country transcends patriotism. This is about sacrifice for fellow man, not just country.

I’m thankful we have a country that allows us freedom to worship my God. I’m acutely aware of the fact that we’re far from perfect, and we’ve got things yet to improve. But the fact we can, and will, is worth fighting for. That’s worth remembering. I believe it’s what every family who had lost a loved one would want to remember as well.

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